A Reflections Award is “Within Reach”

First place entry in the photography category: a photo of a tricolored heron. Photo by Benjamin Blanck

Many students at Chamblee Charter High School have a passion for art, whether it be visual arts, literature, or photography, and that passion is reflected in their daily work. You can imagine, then, that the work students submitted to the Reflections art contest reflected some of their best.

The Reflections contest, a school wide art competition coordinated by the Parent Teacher Association, contains six categories: dance choreography, film production, literature, music composition, photography and visual arts. Winners at Chamblee were recently chosen in the latter four categories.

Roze Carbone, a sophomore, entered into three categories: visual arts, literature, and photography, and placed first in all three. She also placed third for a second visual arts submission.

“I’ve participated in it the past few years and won, and this year I kept my streak going,” said Carbone.

Each year, the Reflections contest has a theme, which all students are encouraged to incorporate into their submission. This year, the theme was “Within Reach.” Carbone believed that one of her visual arts submissions, a paper crane mobile, embodied this theme especially well.

The crane in the center of the mobile, according to Carbone, represented herself, while the other cranes around her represented her family and peers: her support system. At the top of the mobile was a bead, which represented the goddess of creativity.

“I wanted to show that my future is on a creative path, and that’s within reach for me,” said Carbone.

Junior Benjamin Blanck, who won first place in the 11th grade photography category, had a set of photos as possible submissions, but decided to submit a photo of a Tricolored Heron. (See accompanying photo.)

“The heron was literally within reach,” said Blanck. “It was probably the closest I’ve ever gotten to one; it was only an arm’s length away.”

Sophomore Keren Sahar’s literature category submission, a poem, also represented the theme, but in a more figurative sense.

“I wrote my poem about cancer and about how the cure for cancer can be within reach,” said Sahar.

The theme “Within Reach” was released in the summer of 2017. Many students, such as junior Joyce Yun,  had already been thinking about their possible entries for the contest.

“Once they released the theme in the summer, I started thinking about it and I had so many ideas but I didn’t know how to put them out on paper,” said Yun.

Yun’s colored pencil and marker drawing was awarded first place in the 11th grade visual arts category.

“This year I felt like my drawing was a little rushed, so I was sorta surprised that I won, but I was happy,” said Yun.

The Reflections contest is not only a way to have fun practicing an art form, but it is also a great way to gain recognition for your art.

“I want to have a career focused on art, and the way to do that is to enter competitions and start getting awards,” said Sahar. “The Reflections contest is an easy way to do that.”

Freshman Nicholas Oselette won first place in two categories, photography and music composition. Composing music is something that Oselette hopes to do as a career. Submitting a composition in the Reflections contest is a means of recognition for his work.

“I wanted exposure of my music so I could possibly get somewhere in life in the future with it,” said Oselette.

Not only is the Reflections contest helpful in gaining appreciation from colleges or other career options, but it is also an enjoyable means for students to do something that they love doing.

“I’ve always submitted something in the reflections contest,” said Wu. “I like art-related stuff and it’s a great opportunity to do something artsy.”

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